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Daring Greatly!


After recounting my less-than-proud moment of vulnerability from last week, I decided to take up the advice of the student affairs coordinator at my college and look up some books by Dr. Brene Brown.  She researches and writes about “women and shame.”  It was highly recommended to me that I read Daring Greatly, so I looked up the book on her website and I found that she got the title of the book from Theodore Roosevelt’s famous speech, Citizenship in a Republic:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again,

because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause;

who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly . . .”

I wish I had read and thought hard about this quote before now.  I need to make this concept a reality if I am ever going to make it through the rest of my training  Needless to say, I will be reading this book.  In fact, it is already ordered and should be in my mailbox this week.  I hope.

13 thoughts on “Daring Greatly!

    1. I do! I am reading another one of her boks, “I thought it was just me…” I am actually excited to be on call tomorrow because I might have some time to read it! Was it you, or Courtney who also suggested I read her books? I can’t remember…

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        1. Now that I think about it, it probably was you! If I had more time I would have actually looked through all my previous comments! Thanks for recommending it!

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  1. It’s a very interesting book! I only skimmed it (my friend had to read it for class last semester, and it was oddly relevant to the assignment I was doing, so I took snippets of wisdom from it), but it’s very well-written and makes very compelling arguments about the pressures we put on ourselves (esp. because of our gender roles). I’ll take this as a reminder/sign to put it on my “To-Actually-Read” list. 🙂

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    1. What kind of assignment did you have to do? I hope you do get a chance to actually read it because I am just done the intro and I love it! I feel like it was written for me!!!

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  2. Sound like a great book, I’m going to check it out. As far as your vulnerability, don’t worry about it. I have just spent 24 years learning to understand my Mother and why she treated me like she did. Lots of hard work and now—well I am mostly healed from the damage and brokenness and I can see her as another person who had a very traumatic childhood. Now I am feeling free. Take care and a good therapist really helps.

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  3. I’ve been thinking a lot about courage and my fear of making mistakes since I published my novel, Absent Children.

    I’ve had some very positive feedback on the book, but I also know that the subject matter (home birth) is controversial, and my writing style isn’t conventional, so I’m sure there will be readers who disapprove of it. So far, I’m coping with that concern, although I have moments…

    It is the fear of other people’s judgment that often stops us from doing what we want to. If we could all accept each other without judgement, there’d be no reason for anyone to be afraid of taking chances. Everyone makes mistakes in life – no one is immune.

    Maybe I should read this book, too. It’s an interesting subject.

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    1. I cant think of how often I haven’t done something out of fear of being judged negatively. It’s a bad Habit to get into and hard one to break!

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  4. Just bought Daring Greatly last week, love it so far! Will check back here often to see what’s going on in your attempts to open up more. Good luck! We got this 🙂

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